Arrest Reports and Laws

Melissa Louise York Arrested

Melissa Louise York was arrested on Friday, April 16th 2021 and booked into Clackamas County Jail in Clackamas, Oregon.

Clackamas County Mugshots -  Melissa Louise            York

The female arrested was listed as having a date of birth of 9/22/95 and was arrested for suspicion of the below crimes:

  1. ORS.165.013 - FORGERY I
  2. ORS.165.803 - AGGRAVATED IDENTITY THEFT
  3. ORS.166.270-1 - FELON POSS OF RESTRICT WEAPON
  4. ORS.813.010-5 - DUII - CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE
  5. ORS.165.022 - CRIM POSSN FORGED INSTR I

Bail has been set to 45000 for York which is listed as a 5.0 ft 1 in white female weighing approximately 130 lbs.

Melissa Louise York was arrested in Clackamas County Oregon and Melissa Louise York has a presumption of innocence which means that although the person was arrested, they are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Presumption of innocence” serves to emphasize that the prosecution has the obligation to prove each element of the offense beyond a reasonable doubt (or some other level of proof depending on the criminal justice system) and that the accused bears no burden of proof. For more information in presumption of innocence, wikipedia is a great place to start.

This information is made available by the local sheriff’s office near Clackamas County Oregon. For more regarding the Clackamas County Sheriffs department you can visit their website. They can also be contact them at their about us page.

Melissa Louise York is presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Oregon Sentencing Guidelines


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Below are the Oregon laws which may relate to this arrest:


Forgery in the first degree.
(1) A person commits the crime of forgery in the first degree if the person violates ORS 165.007:(a) And the written instrument is or purports to be any of the following:
(A) Part of an issue of money, securities, postage or revenue stamps, or other valuable instruments issued by a government or governmental agency;
(B) Part of an issue of stock, bonds or other instruments representing interests in or claims against any property or person;
(C) A deed, will, codicil, contract or assignment;
(D) A check for $1,000 or more, a credit card purchase slip for $1,000 or more, or a combination of checks and credit card purchase slips that, in the aggregate, total $1,000 or more, or any other commercial instrument or other document that does or may evidence, create, transfer, alter, terminate or otherwise affect a legal right, interest, obligation or status; or
(E) A public record; or
(b) By falsely making, completing or altering, or by uttering, at least 15 retail sales receipts, Universal Product Code labels, EAN-8 labels or EAN-13 labels or a combination of at least 15 retail sales receipts, Universal Product Code labels, EAN-8 labels or EAN-13 labels.
(2) The value of single check or credit card transactions may be added together under subsection (1)(a)(D) of this section if the transactions were committed:
(a) Against multiple victims within a 30-day period; or
(b) Against the same victim within a 180-day period.
(3) Forgery in the first degree is a Class C felony. [1971 c.743 §153; 1993 c.680 §25; 2005 c.761 §1]
Aggravated identity theft.
(1) A person commits the crime of aggravated identity theft if:(a) The person violates ORS 165.800 in 10 or more separate incidents within a 180-day period;
(b) The person violates ORS 165.800 and the person has a previous conviction for aggravated identity theft;
(c) The person violates ORS 165.800 and the losses incurred in a single or aggregate transaction are $10,000 or more within a 180-day period; or
(d) The person violates ORS 165.800 and has in the person’s custody, possession or control 10 or more pieces of personal identification from 10 or more different persons.
(2) Aggravated identity theft is a Class B felony.
(3) As used in this section, previous conviction includes:
(a) Convictions occurring before, on or after January 1, 2008; and
(b) Convictions entered in any other state or federal court for comparable offenses.
(4) The state shall plead in the accusatory instrument and prove beyond a reasonable doubt, as an element of the offense, the previous conviction for aggravated identity theft. [2007 c.584 §1]
Possession of weapons by certain felons.
(1) Any person who has been convicted of a felony under the law of this state or any other state, or who has been convicted of a felony under the laws of the Government of the United States, who owns or has in the person’s possession or under the person’s custody or control any firearm commits the crime of felon in possession of a firearm.(2) Any person who has been convicted of a felony under the law of this state or any other state, or who has been convicted of a felony under the laws of the Government of the United States, who owns or has in the person’s possession or under the person’s custody or control any instrument or weapon having a blade that projects or swings into position by force of a spring or by centrifugal force or any blackjack, slungshot, sandclub, sandbag, sap glove, metal knuckles or an Electro-Muscular Disruption Technology device as defined in ORS 165.540, or who carries a dirk, dagger or stiletto, commits the crime of felon in possession of a restricted weapon.
(3) For the purposes of this section, a person has been convicted of a felony if, at the time of conviction for an offense, that offense was a felony under the law of the jurisdiction in which it was committed. Such conviction shall not be deemed a conviction of a felony if:
(a) The court declared the conviction to be a misdemeanor at the time of judgment; or
(b) The offense was possession of marijuana and the conviction was prior to January 1, 1972.
(4) Subsection (1) of this section does not apply to any person who has been:
(a) Convicted of only one felony under the law of this state or any other state, or who has been convicted of only one felony under the laws of the United States, which felony did not involve criminal homicide, as defined in ORS 163.005, or the possession or use of a firearm or a weapon having a blade that projects or swings into position by force of a spring or by centrifugal force, and who has been discharged from imprisonment, parole or probation for said offense for a period of 15 years prior to the date of alleged violation of subsection (1) of this section; or
(b) Granted relief from the disability under 18 U.S.C. 925(c) or ORS 166.274 or has had the person’s record expunged under the laws of this state or equivalent laws of another jurisdiction.
(5) Felon in possession of a firearm is a Class C felony. Felon in possession of a restricted weapon is a Class A misdemeanor. [Amended by 1975 c.702 §1; 1985 c.543 §4; 1985 c.709 §2; 1987 c.853 §1; 1989 c.839 §4; 1993 c.735 §2; 1995 c.518 §1; 1999 c.1040 §16; 2003 c.14 §64; 2009 c.189 §1; 2009 c.499 §3]
Driving under the influence of intoxicants; penalty.
(1) A person commits the offense of driving while under the influence of intoxicants if the person drives a vehicle while the person:(a) Has 0.08 percent or more by weight of alcohol in the blood of the person as shown by chemical analysis of the breath or blood of the person made under ORS 813.100, 813.140 or 813.150;
(b) Is under the influence of intoxicating liquor, a controlled substance or an inhalant; or
(c) Is under the influence of any combination of intoxicating liquor, an inhalant and a controlled substance.
(2) A person may not be convicted of driving while under the influence of intoxicants on the basis of being under the influence of a controlled substance or an inhalant unless the fact that the person was under the influence of a controlled substance or an inhalant is pleaded in the accusatory instrument and is either proved at trial or is admitted by the person through a guilty plea.
(3) A person convicted of the offense described in this section is subject to ORS 813.020 in addition to this section.
(4) Except as provided in subsection (5) of this section, the offense described in this section, driving while under the influence of intoxicants, is a Class A misdemeanor and is applicable upon any premises open to the public.
(5)(a) Driving while under the influence of intoxicants is a Class C felony if the current offense was committed in a motor vehicle and the person has, at least three times in the 10 years prior to the date of the current offense, been convicted of, or been found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for an act that if committed by an adult would be, any of the following offenses in any combination:
(A) Driving while under the influence of intoxicants in violation of:
(i) This section; or
(ii) The statutory counterpart to this section in another jurisdiction.
(B) A driving under the influence of intoxicants offense in another jurisdiction that involved the impaired driving or operation of a vehicle, an aircraft or a boat due to the use of intoxicating liquor, a controlled substance, an inhalant or any combination thereof.
(C) A driving offense in another jurisdiction that involved operating a vehicle, an aircraft or a boat while having a blood alcohol content above that jurisdiction’s permissible blood alcohol content.
(b) For the purposes of paragraph (a) of this subsection, a conviction or adjudication for a driving offense in another jurisdiction based solely on a person under 21 years of age having a blood alcohol content that is lower than the permissible blood alcohol content in that jurisdiction for a person 21 years of age or older does not constitute a prior conviction or adjudication.
(6) In addition to any other sentence that may be imposed, the court shall impose one or more of the following fines on a person convicted of driving while under the influence of intoxicants as follows:
(a) For a person’s first conviction, a minimum of $1,000.
(b) For a person’s second conviction, a minimum of $1,500.
(c) For a person’s third or subsequent conviction, a minimum of $2,000 if the person is not sentenced to a term of imprisonment.
(d) For a person who drives a vehicle while the person has 0.15 percent or more by weight of alcohol in the blood of the person as shown by chemical analysis of the breath or blood of the person made under ORS 813.100, 813.140 or 813.150, a minimum of $2,000.
(7) Notwithstanding ORS 161.635, $10,000 is the maximum fine that a court may impose on a person convicted of driving while under the influence of intoxicants if:
(a) The current offense was committed in a motor vehicle; and
(b) There was a passenger in the motor vehicle who was under 18 years of age and was at least three years younger than the person driving the motor vehicle. [1983 c.338 §587; 1985 c.16 §293; 1987 c.138 §5; 1991 c.835 §7; 1999 c.619 §3; 1999 c.1049 §1; 2003 c.14 §495; 2003 c.445 §1; 2007 c.879 §3; 2009 c.525 §1; 2009 c.613 §1]
Criminal possession of a forged instrument in the first degree.
(1) A person commits the crime of criminal possession of a forged instrument in the first degree if, knowing it to be forged and with intent to utter same, the person possesses a forged instrument of the kind and in the amount specified in ORS 165.013 (1).(2) Criminal possession of a forged instrument in the first degree is a Class C felony. [1971 c.743 §155; 2005 c.761 §2]